RESTORATION EVIDENCE

Individual study: Energy and moisture considerations on cutover peatlands: surface microtopography, mulch cover and Sphagnum regeneration

Published source details

Price J., Rochefort L. & Quinty F. (1998) Energy and moisture considerations on cutover peatlands: surface microtopography, mulch cover and Sphagnum regeneration. Ecological Engineering, 10, 293-312


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Create mounds or hollows (before planting) Peatland Conservation

A replicated, randomized, paired, controlled, before-and-after study in 1995–1996 in a historically mined raised bog in Quebec, Canada (Price et al. 1998) found that roughening the peat surface, before sowing Sphagnum-dominated vegetation fragments, had no effect on Sphagnum moss cover. After 1–2 growing seasons, roughened and smooth plots had similar cover of Sphagnum, when compared amongst mulched areas (roughened: 1.4–4.7%; smooth: 1.2–2.3%) or unmulched areas (roughened: 0.1–0.3%; smooth: 0.1–0.2%). In May 1995, twelve 15 x 30 m plots were established, in three blocks of four, on bare rewetted peat. Three plots (one random plot/block) received each roughening treatment: harrowing (5 cm deep), ploughing (20 cm deep), using bulldozer tracks to create trenches (1 m wide, 20 cm deep), or no intervention (smooth plots). Then, all plots were sown with vegetation fragments (mostly Sphagnum moss) from the surface of a nearby bog. Half of each plot was mulched with straw. In June and September 1996, Sphagnum cover was estimated in 36–72 quadrats/plot, each 25 x 25 cm.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)

Cover peatland with organic mulch (after planting) Peatland Conservation

A replicated, randomized, paired, controlled, before-and-after study in 1995–1996 in a historically mined raised bog in Quebec, Canada (Price et al. 1998) found that mulching plots sown with Sphagnum-dominated vegetation fragments increased Sphagnum moss cover. After 1–2 growing seasons, plots mulched with straw after adding the vegetation fragments had significantly higher Sphagnum cover (1–5%) than plots that were not mulched (<0.5%). In May 1995, 24 bare peat plots (15 x 15 m, in three blocks of eight) were sown with vegetation fragments (mostly Sphagnum moss) from the surface of a nearby bog. Twelve of the plots (four random plots/block) were mulched with straw after sowing (2,250 kg/ha). All plots had been rewetted, and the surface of some was roughened. In June and September 1996, Sphagnum cover was estimated in 36–72 quadrats/plot, each 25 x 25 cm.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)

Add mixed vegetation to peatland surface Peatland Conservation

A replicated before-and-after study in 1995–1996 in a historically mined raised bog in Quebec, Canada (Price et al. 1998) reported that plots sown with Sphagnum-dominated vegetation fragments (and mulched and/or roughened) developed some cover of mosses and vascular plants. Before sowing, plots were bare peat. After one year, Sphagnum cover was between 0.5 and 5%, other moss cover <1.5% and vascular plant cover <1.5%. Additionally, Sphagnum cover was significantly higher in plots mulched with straw (2–5%) than in unmulched plots (<0.5%) but was similar in roughened and smooth plots (<0.5–5% vs <0.5–2%). In May 1995, vegetation fragments (mostly Sphagnum moss) from the surface of a nearby bog were spread onto 24 rewetted bare peat plots (15 x 15 m). Twelve plots were also mulched with straw; twelve were not mulched. Eighteen plots had been roughened (by harrowing, ploughing or driving a bulldozer over); six were left smooth. In September 1996, vegetation cover was estimated in 36–72 quadrats/plot, each 25 x 25 cm.

(Summarised by Nigel Taylor)